06. Yours, forever. | Unconditional

August 16, 2020 Sujay Sarma

The big day was here, finally. We had a small Hindu ceremony at a local temple. Friends acted as family for both sides and participated eagerly in the different traditions. The aged couple that ran my favourite Indian restaurant acted as her parents and gave her away to me in a traditional ‘kanyadaan’. Uncle even…


The big day was here, finally. We had a small Hindu ceremony at a local temple. Friends acted as family for both sides and participated eagerly in the different traditions. The aged couple that ran my favourite Indian restaurant acted as her parents and gave her away to me in a traditional ‘kanyadaan’. Uncle even wept as if his own daughter was going away.

“I never had a daughter of my own. This is equally heart-breaking.” He sobbed. “But I am also so happy!” He cried with laughter.

We had written vows to each other. Though Hindu weddings did not feature vow-recitals, they were included in the chanted Sanskrit mantras, we had wanted to do them.

“I have never found a more perfect person for me. You complete me in ways that I could never imagine. I found you when we were both very young. We grew up together, as did my affections for you. I have always and will always love you unconditionally. And today, I finally have the pleasure of being married to you.” I said.

“I’ve called you many things over the years. Shared thoughts and ideas. Fought with you. You have already been there for me in good times and in bad. I have always and will always love you unconditionally. I cannot be happier than I am now, to accept you as my husband.” She said.

Laughing in mock glee, our friends pushed us into our bedroom. They had decked it in traditional ‘first night’ décor. Flowers everywhere. Fruits and milk and other things laid out.

“You guys are nuts!” I cried as they shut and locked the door from the outside.

Juhi sat on the bed. I went to her. She covered her face with her sari’s pallo.

“Come on!” I teased her.

“No. I need to tell you something.” She said through the folds of the sari.

“What?” I asked, revealing her face.

She took up two little dolls from her nightstand and put them in my hands.

“Two?” I asked, raising an eyebrow.

“I don’t know.” She shook her head furiously.

I hugged her.

We lay talking about children for a long time. Reminiscing of the times that we ourselves had been children. I had a great memory, going very far back. I told her somethings from my earliest childhood and infancy. She was shocked.

“Surely you don’t really remember that!” she screamed, laughing.

I was finally about to doze off, when she asked, “Do you want them to call you ‘daddy’ or ‘uncle’?”

She slept quite soundly after that. I even heard her snore a little. But I couldn’t sleep a wink.

The End


About the author:

Sujay Sarma is an IT industry veteran, about 43 years of age. He has spent 25 years in the IT industry and has done it all, and seen it all. Now, his passion is writing [blogs, stories, novels] and music. He has his own YouTube channel called "Sujay Sarma's Musical Adventures" where he posts his covers and originals, and a Podcast named "Interesting People Interesting Stories".
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